Friday, August 12, 2011

Links for Noting

* Bruce Chalton quotes a discussion by Tolkien of the differences between the evil of Morgoth and the evil of Sauron and reflects on it.

* Jason Zarri, A Dilemma for Dialetheism

* The Stained Glass Work of Dante Gabriel Rossetti

* Jean-Luc Marion on Christian Philosophy

* I once, a long time ago, noted a relatively new phenomenon in the internet, the Cause for Canonization website, and made a list of a number of them. Here's one for Catherine of Aragon.

* Very much in agreement with this post at DarwinCatholic.

* Lucy Knisley sums up the Twilight series (second comic on the page), so that you will never have to read it.

* Henry Karlson has a good post on Maximus of Tyre.

4 comments:

  1. Jason Zarri12:23 AM

    Hi Brandon,
    Thanks for the link! Hope you're having a good summer.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Henry Karlson6:30 AM

    I would also like to thank you for the link to my post. I was surprised at how quickly you put it up. Of course, not many people deal with Maximus of Tyre, so I guess, any post on him is a good post ;)

    ReplyDelete
  3. branemrys7:37 PM

    Not quite true, but it's definitely the case that your competition is pretty weak at this point. :)

    ReplyDelete
  4. branemrys11:03 PM

    A bit busier than I would like, but otherwise quite good.

    ReplyDelete

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