Sunday, July 22, 2012

Book a Week, July 22

After so much heavy fiction recently, I need a bit of a break, so we're taking a slimmer and I hope easier volume this week, Ernest Haycox's The Adventurers, another volume from my grandfather's library that I haven't read yet. Haycox was a native of Portland, Oregon; he was a prolific writer, managing to write twelve novels and over three hundred short stories. In his day he was very highly regarded; he was, for instance, one of Ernest Hemingway's favorite authors. Except for some early works set in the American Revolution, his works seem to be all Western fiction: cowboys, frontiers, pioneers, and the like. Several of his stories were made into movies; one of his short stories, in fact, was made into a John Wayne movie, Stagecoach. Haycox is usually listed as among the greats of the genre, along with notable names like Louis L'Amour and Zane Grey, so it should at least be enjoyable light reading.

2 comments:

  1. Your grandfather's library sounds delightful -- how fortunate one is in having book-loving (or at least book-collecting) grandparents! When my grandpa passed away, I inherited his collection of Tolkien ephemera -- the appendices, the unfinished tales, all that stuff that Christopher Tolkien is now making a living out of curating. Also, after my sister was finished with the lot, I got his collection of midcentury mysteries, including a full set of Nero Wolfe books. These have become my favorite reading fix when I'm tired of anything heavy: they reward re-reading because the plots fall lightly on the memory and the banter never gets old. And, they remind me of my grandfather, who was really the gentlest and sweetest man.

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  2. It's definitely hard to beat Nero Wolfe for light reading -- consistently easy to get through without being stupid.

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