Monday, May 02, 2016

Sullivan on Plato on Trump

I don't usually find Andrew Sullivan very interesting, but he has a remarkably good discussion of Plato and democracy up at NYMag.com:

As this dystopian election campaign has unfolded, my mind keeps being tugged by a passage in Plato’s Republic. It has unsettled — even surprised — me from the moment I first read it in graduate school. The passage is from the part of the dialogue where Socrates and his friends are talking about the nature of different political systems, how they change over time, and how one can slowly evolve into another. And Socrates seemed pretty clear on one sobering point: that “tyranny is probably established out of no other regime than democracy.” What did Plato mean by that? Democracy, for him, I discovered, was a political system of maximal freedom and equality, where every lifestyle is allowed and public offices are filled by a lottery. And the longer a democracy lasted, Plato argued, the more democratic it would become. Its freedoms would multiply; its equality spread. Deference to any sort of authority would wither; tolerance of any kind of inequality would come under intense threat; and multiculturalism and sexual freedom would create a city or a country like “a many-colored cloak decorated in all hues.”

He goes on at greater length. He gets Plato essentially right, and, what's more, does so on a point on which professional philosophers sometimes trip up due to prior assumptions; thus, whether one agrees with the lessons he draws or not (and there are here and there bits of the rather odd and gossipy quirks that come up whenever he talks politics), it's a commendable look at Plato and how his political philosophy reflects on our own political system.

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