Wednesday, December 18, 2013

Fortnightly Books Index

There will be a brief pause in fortnightly books, to be back after various holiday things. We're about forty-two or so books in, so it seemed good to give an index to it all. A lot of them have been re-reads, but of those that were first-times, the most pleasant surprises, I think, were Njal's Saga and Death Comes for the Archbishop, and perhaps also The Song of Bernadette. The biggest disappointment is still The Red and the Black.

November 24: Susanna Clarke, Jonathan Strange& Mr Norrell
Introduction; Review

November 10: Charles Williams, Many Dimensions
Introduction; Review

October 27: Bram Stoker, Dracula
Introduction; Review

October 13: Jane Austen, Lady Susan
Introduction; Review

September 29: Rudyard Kipling, Kim
Introduction; Review

September 15: Tim Powers, Declare
Introduction; Review

September 1: Mac Hyman, No Time for Sergeants
Introduction; Review

August 18: Booth Tarkington, Monsieur Beaucaire
Introduction; Review

August 4: J.R.R. Tolkien, Roverandom
Introduction; Review

July 14: Mark Twain, Personal Recollections of Joan of Arc
Introduction; Review; Background Timeline

June 23: Franz Werfel, The Song of Bernadette
Introduction; Review; Background Timeline

June 9: Frank Herbert, The Santaroga Barrier
Introduction; Review

May 26: Dale Brown, Storming Heaven; Dale Brown, Shadows of Steel
Introduction; Review

April 28: John P. Marquand, Think Fast, Mr. Moto
Introduction; Review

April 14: Roger Donlon (as told to Warren Rogers), Outpost of Freedom
Introduction; Review

March 31: George Bernard Shaw, Two Plays for Puritans; George Bernard Shaw, Man and Superman
Introduction; Review

March 10: Lord Dunsany, The King of Elfland's Daughter
Introduction; Review

February 24: Goethe, Wilhelm Meister's Apprenticeship
Introduction; Review

February 10: J. Harvey Howells, The Big Company Look
Introduction; Review

January 27: Victor Hugo, Les Misérables
Introduction; Review

January 13: George B. Markle IV, The Teka Stone
Introduction; Review

2012

November 25: Njal's Saga
Introduction; Review

November 11: J. R. R. Tolkien, The Legend of Sigurd and Gudrén
Introduction; Review

October 28: The Kalevala
Introduction; Review

October 14: C. S. Lewis, Till We Have Faces
Introduction; Review

September 30: Kenneth Dodson, Away All Boats
Introduction; Review

September 16: James Fenimore Cooper, The Deerslayer
Introduction; Review

September 2: Edna Ferber, Cimarron
Introduction; Review

August 19: Johann Wyss, The Swiss Family Robinson
Introduction; Review

Prior to August 19, the series was 'Book a Week'; it was changed to 'Fortnightly Book' to make it a bit more manageable in busy times.

August 12: George MacDonald, Lilith
Introduction; Review

August 5: Noél Coward, Future Indefinite
Introduction; Review

July 29: Alexander Pushkin, Eugene Onegin
Introduction; Review

July 22: Ernest Haycox, The Adventurers
Introduction; Review

July 15: Gustave Flaubert, Madame Bovary
Introduction; Review

July 8: Stendhal, The Red and the Black
Introduction; Review; Background Timeline

June 24: Jane Austen, Sanditon; Jane Austen, The Watsons
Introduction; Review

June 17: Theodore Morrison, The Devious Way
Introduction; Review

June 10: Joseph Conrad, Nostromo
Introduction; Review

June 3: Willa Cather, Death Comes for the Archbishop
Introduction; Review

May 27: Norman Douglas, South Wind
Introduction; Review

May 20: Frank G. Slaughter, Sword and Scalpel
Introduction; Review

May 13: Magdalen King-Hall, The Diary of a Young Lady of Fashion in the Year 1764-1765
Introduction; Review

2 comments:

  1. Enbrethiliel9:53 AM

    +JMJ+



    I keep forgetting to tell you how much I admire your persistence and faithfulness with respect to this reading project!



    Also, a question: How do you choose which book you will read next?

    ReplyDelete
  2. branemrys10:52 AM

    It tends to be pretty random -- I have a number of books on my shelves that I inherited from my grandfather and grandmother that I haven't I gotten around to reading yet, and those are the eventually-must-be-on-the-list books. But external factors can interfere -- a lot of the works that do end up on the list are books I've read, just not in a while. Sometimes they get on the list just because they happen to catch my eye when I'm choosing a book; a lot of times, I pick them because I'm at a busy point in the year and need something I can read and say something about without too much additional work. Sometimes books just get chosen because they are short, too. In at least one case -- Frank Herbert's Santaroga Barrier -- it was in response to a request, and in another -- Jane Austen's Lady Susan -- I was re-reading it because of the possibility that I might be doing an Austen-and-ethics course (which fell through) and I wanted to check whether a possible assignment involving it would work. In a few cases, I had picked up a book (e.g., Njal's Saga, which I had first read about at the DarwinCatholic blog) and just never gotten around to it, so it got chosen just to make sure that I would definitely make time to read them.

    I'm surprised myself that I managed to last this long with this series; I usually peter out with series. I think the flexibility of it helps, and the fact that I'd generally be reading something, anyway.

    ReplyDelete

Please understand that this weblog runs on a third-party comment system, not on Blogger's comment system. If you have come by way of a mobile device and can see this message, you may have landed on the Blogger comment page, or the third party commenting system has not yet completely loaded; your comments will only be shown on this page and not on the page most people will see, and it is much more likely that your comment will be missed.