Wednesday, April 20, 2005

Readables

* Descartes without the boring parts and Ici s'honore du titre de citoyen (which points out the Notes et Archives 1789-1794) at "Philosophical Fortnights"

* Baudrillard and the Matrix Trilogy at "postmodernism" (hat-tip: Mormon Metaphysics)

* Boys and Bikinis at "Wittingshire" (hat-tip: Razorskiss)

* If you ever lose Sharon Howard, you now know where to look.

* A good post on a point in Buddhism at Under the Sun

* For anyone interested in Bonaventure, Ratzinger's 1957 book The Theology of History in St. Bonaventure is a must-read. Alas, I can't find any selections from it online. Some people have suggested that part of Ratzinger's reaction to liberation theology is due to the ideas developed in his study of Bonaventure; and one could expect the same ideas to play a role in the Benedixt XVI papacy. For a very critical account of these ideas (with quotations from various works by Ratzinger), one can read the Society of St. Pius X's review of Ratzinger's memoirs:

The Memories of a Destructive Mind, Part I
The Memories of a Destructive Mind, Part II

That it is the Society of St. Pius X makes it very unsurprising that the review is critical, of course, but the review is interesting; and it is also interesting to remember that Ratzinger is sometimes criticized for not being conservative enough. A more favorable review of the memoirs is found at First Things.

* On a different note entirely, Rebecca at "Rebecca Writes" gives us John Knox's Dying Words. Coming Boldly to the Throne is also worth a reading.

* "Challies.com" has a post on Total Depravity (hat-tip to the great Rebecca Stark herself)

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